26 Weeks of Muffins, Weeks 2 & 3

We’re currently on week 3 of our “26 weeks of muffins” challenge to try and help little E outgrow her dairy allergy more quickly.  I’m not so sure we’re going in the right direction, but we’ll get to that in a moment.  First, I have to gush over the Old-Fashioned Donut Muffins I made the week before last.  They legit tasted like donuts, complete with a sugary glaze that makes me drool just thinking about it.

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That was week two.  E had her share of the glazed donut muffins for the week (and I had mine) and she had no reactions.

In the meantime, we stayed pretty busy.  We took E to an exotic petting zoo, where she turned her nose up at the kangaroos and the sloth and the monkeys, but she lost her SHIZ over the sheep.  There were four in particular she was obsessed with and they wanted nothing to do with her.  She didn’t care.  DAMN IT, they were going to be her friends whether they wanted it or not.

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Also, I was pretty excited when E recently started stringing two words together.  Like, “that bird” and “daddy car.”  But now she’s decided “no mommy” is pretty much her favorite phrase.  And I had thought just “no” was bad.

At least she’s become the perfect little helper.  She helps with chores and she feeds the dog and she puts things away for me when I ask her to.  I’m writing this down as proof because when she’s 14 and sassing me because I’ve asked her to clean her room, she’ll never believe there was a day when she LIKED to clean.

So back to the (SIGHHHHH) muffins.

I realized that by straying from the original baked-milk-challenge-recipe the doctor had given me, I’d miscalculated the amount of milk going into the batches of muffins I was baking.  There should be 1/6 cup of milk in each muffin, which equals 1/12 cup in each serving I give to E.  So far the muffins she’s been getting have only had 1/12 cup per muffin, or a mere 1/24 cup per half-muffin.  This past Sunday, I reverted back to the original recipe while I research recipes with the correct amount of milk.  That means that starting this week, E has been getting twice the amount of milk she was getting before.

I’m hoping it’s a coincidence.  I’m desperately, begging-the-universe and pleading-with-the-allergy-gods, hoping it’s a coincidence.  Since starting the “correct” muffins two days ago, E’s bowel movements have changed.  They’re worse and they’re a different color.  (“TMI” goes out the window when you have a toddler, right?)  Now she has a terrible, painful diaper rash that looks allergic in nature.  She had a full-face rash tonight and she had hives and red patches on her arms and her ear, of all places.

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I’ve noted it down as a potential reaction.  If it continues or gets worse, I’ll have to call the allergist to see what he thinks.

Poop.

 

Baked Milk Challenge

Last week we had E retested for her dairy, egg, and peanut allergies.  It’s been six months since her last blood test when her allergist was hopeful she was starting to outgrow her dairy allergy.

I already knew the peanut allergy was still going strong.  A month ago E had a reaction from cross contamination.  I gave her a piece of toast with cashew butter that was fresh ground in a machine right next to a peanut grinder.  Never again.  This pic was taken about six hours after exposure:

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I also expected we were still dealing with an egg allergy since we’ve had some suspected cross contamination reactions there as well.  I was correct in both of my suspicions–egg and peanut are both too high to do anything but retest again in six months and see if the IgE numbers have decreased any.

E’s milk numbers dipped low enough, though, that her allergist allowed us to try a baked milk challenge in the office.  They gave me a recipe for muffins (we still had to use an egg substitute) and we set up an appointment to monitor E after she ate them to see if she had any reactions.

Our appointment was at 8:45, almost an hour later than E’s normal breakfast time.  She would have to eat two muffins for the challenge, so I had to starve the poor child until we got to the allergist’s office.  By the time the challenge began, she was so excited to be presented with the 1/4 of a muffin she was allowed to start out with.  When she finished, we waited 20 minutes and monitored for a reaction.  There wasn’t one.

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Next she got half of a muffin and we watched her for 20 more minutes.  There was still no reaction.  I texted updates to B about every 15 minutes.  The last leg of the challenge was for E to eat a whole muffin, and we would monitor her for 45 minutes.  After the whole muffin, I texted B and we were both so thrilled that E wasn’t reacting.

No sooner had I texted him that last update than I noticed it:  all of my excitement and hope and optimism melting away as a rash appeared on her left cheek.

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I stepped into the hallway and summoned the allergist, who came in and examined E’s face.  He noted the rash and asked me to step out and let him know if it spread or got worse.

Over the next 20 minutes, the rash began to fade, but then more began to appear on other parts of her face–the other cheek, below her eye, in between the eyebrows.  I knew what this all meant but I refused to believe it until the allergist said the words himself: that E hadn’t passed the challenge.

What this means:  despite E’s super low IgE numbers for dairy, she can’t completely tolerate baked milk.  What this doesn’t mean:  that there’s no hope and we’re not making progress.  Though E reacted, it was mild enough that her allergist wants to continue exposing her to very small amounts of baked milk regularly in the hopes of building up a tolerance.  For the next six months, we’ll give E half a muffin, three times per week.  When we retest at her second birthday, the hope is that her numbers will have come down significantly and we can redo the challenge and pass with flying colors.

What THIS means:  I’ll be baking.  A lot.  Every single week.  The muffins need to be fresh, so there’s no batch baking and freezing here.

What THAT means:  I picked a good time to get back into running.  Mmmmmmmm muffinsssssss.

I had a nice little cry after we left the allergist’s office.  It’s a step in the right direction and for that I’m grateful.  But it’s tough, knowing that on your child’s second birthday she will still be unable to tolerate so many foods in a world that is awfully insensitive to dietary needs.  It’s a hard thing to accept.  But we will keep fighting and I will continue to hope.

There is no substitute for milk

We’ve finished up a week of incorporating hemp milk into E’s diet, and let’s face it:  it’s not ideal.  By replacing just five ounces of E’s daily formula intake with hemp milk, the girl has been beyond ravenous.  We have to find another option.

badchoiceLet’s recap:  Cow’s milk is out.  Goat’s milk is out.  Hemp milk is out.  Soy milk is an option but I have my reservations about soy being a major source of E’s nutrition. Hypoallergenic toddler formula is an option but I have equal reservations about “corn syrup solids” being a major source of E’s nutrition.

So what do we do?

Since E drinks the hemp milk with no issues, I started researching methods of adding protein to nut milk.  What I found was a natural, brown rice-based toddler “protein powder.”  In a nutshell, it’s formula.  That’s not what it’s called, but that’s what it is.  You mix it with “your beverage of choice,” and it contains tons of protein as well as a whole plethora of vitamins and nutrients.  But unlike hypoallergenic formula, its ingredients are plant-based and they’re not scary words that give me nightmares about what I’m feeding to my daughter.

It’s on order (arriving today), so we haven’t tried it yet.  I’ll be back with updates, but until then, my fingers are crossed.  There is no substitute for milk.  I’m just reaching into my bag of tricks to see if I can find something that will work for E.